Killing People & Breaking Things…

““War is about killing people and breaking things.” I have done it, war is not a lot of fun, and intellectually there is little to defend the practice. Notice, I did not say “nothing,” I said “little,” and it is a damn BIG little. It is this simple, if they are willing to kill people… Read More

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What Matters? Ready vs Winning…

“Being ready is not what matters. What matters is winning after you get there.” Victor H. Krulak (1913 to 2008) Victor Harold “Brute” Krulak was a Lieutenant General of the US Marine Corps who saw action in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. Krulak was considered a visionary by fellow Marines, was the author of… Read More

Soldiers: Guilt, Taboo’s & Killing

“There is the guilt all soldiers feel for having broken the taboo against killing, a guilt as old as war itself. Add to this the soldier’s sense of shame for having fought in actions that resulted, indirectly or directly, in the deaths of civilians. Then pile on top of that an attitude of social opprobrium,… Read More

Combat Exposure as a Predictor of Smoking Status

Research Paper Title Combat, PTSD and Smoking Trajectory in a Cohort of Male Australian Army Vietnam Veterans. Background Whether trauma exposure itself or consequent posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is primarily responsible for smoking and failure to quit remains unclear. Methods A cohort of male Australian Vietnam veterans (N = 388) was interviewed twice, 22 and… Read More

Minds, Machines & People…

“Machines don’t fight wars. People do, and they use their minds.” Colonel John R. Boyd (1927-1997) A United States Air Force fighter pilot and Pentagon consultant of the late 20th century, whose theories have been highly influential in the military, sports, business, and litigation. Boyd inspired the Lightweight Fighter programme (LWF) that produced the successful… Read More

Methadone and the Vietnam War

“First synthesised in Germany and introduced after the second world war to treat pain, methadone was widely used in America after the Vietnam war, to treat soldiers who returned home addicted to heroin.” (The Economist, 2017, p.24). Reference The Economist (2017) Not Treating Addiction: What Would Hippocrates Do? The Economist. 15 July, 2017.