On This Day … 26 January

Events 1564 – The Grand Duchy of Lithuania defeats the Tsardom of Russia in the Battle of Ula during the Livonian War. 1565 – Battle of Talikota, fought between the Vijayanagara Empire and the Deccan sultanates, leads to the subjugation, and eventual destruction of the last Hindu kingdom in India, and the consolidation of Islamic… Read More

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On This Day … 25 January

Events AD 41 – After a night of negotiation, Claudius is accepted as Roman Emperor by the Senate. 750 – In the Battle of the Zab, the Abbasid rebels defeat the Umayyad Caliphate, leading to overthrow of the dynasty. 1573 – Battle of Mikatagahara: In Japan, Takeda Shingen defeats Tokugawa Ieyasu. 1704 – The Battle… Read More

Tips Backed By Science to Help You Increase Your Physical Strength

Being immersed in military training is no joke. Once you enlist, you are accountable for various duties and responsibilities as a citizen and a recruit. Military training is a tough and long process, which will start with basic training – aka military boot camp. Since boot camp will last for 6 to 13 weeks, you… Read More

On This Day … 24 January

Events AD 41 – Claudius is proclaimed Roman Emperor by the Praetorian Guard after they assassinate the previous emperor, his nephew Caligula. 661 – The Rashidun Caliphate ends with the assassination of Ali, and the Imamah of the Shia going to the second Imam, Hassan ibn Ali. 914 – Start of the First Fatimid invasion… Read More

Is the Load Carriage Decision Aid (LCDA) an Improvement on other Aids?

Research Paper Title Metabolic Costs of Standing and Walking in Healthy Military-Age Adults: A Meta-regression. Background The Load Carriage Decision Aid (LCDA) is a US Army planning tool that predicts physiological responses of soldiers during different dismounted troop scenarios. The researchers aimed to develop an equation that calculates standing and walking metabolic rates in healthy… Read More

Soldiers Probe & Look For…

“The soldiers probed endlessly for weaknesses among their leaders, but they responded to an officer who was assured enough in his authority to be willing to explain why such and such a thing must be done. Professionalism also commanded respect. The soldiers admired an officer who knew his business, who established a clear understanding of… Read More

Tear Gas: Okay for Protests but Banned in War!

The term “tear-gas” covers a range of chemicals, of which the most widely used include o-chlorobensylidene malononitrile (cs), oleoresin capsicum (oc, or pepper spray) and 1-chloroacetophenone (cn). The gases are in fact powders, and new variants are designed to disperse slowly. Bizarrely, chemicals that are so often used on civilians are banned for military use.… Read More