1.0     IntroductionMilitary Leadership

Once Royal Marines (RM) officers have completed their Phase 1 initial military training at the Commando Training Centre Royal Marines (CTCRM), and their Phase 2 specialist training courses they will move on to their next batch of training and education, which is termed command and staff training (CST).

Table 1 provides an outline of the CST for RM Officers by rank: Table 1: RM Officer T&E by Rank

All residential Phase 3 generic CST courses for officers up to Major Rank are delivered by the Royal Naval and Army Divisions of JSCSC.

2.0     Junior Officer Development Programme

Officers receive a significant amount of leadership training as part of the Phase 1 Initial Officer Training package, which is delivered by CTCRM.

RM Officers undertake their own equivalent of the British Army’s Junior Officer Leadership Programme One (JOLP1), and may then complete either Week 1 of the Royal Navy’s Junior Officer Leadership Course Two (JOLC2) or the British Army’s JOLP3.

Overlaid on these are three modules each of Military Analysis (MA) and Military Knowledge (MK); of which RM Officers must also complete a MK module specific to the RM. These modules are distance learning packages completed in parallel during the course of normal duties; successful completion is a prerequisite for promotion to Major and attendance at the Intermediate Command and Staff Course (ICSC). Those RM Officers selected for ICSC attend the Land, rather than the Maritime, course.

2.1     Junior Officer Leadership Programme One

For information on the Junior Officer Leadership Programme One (JOLP1) please use the following link: British Army Officer Career Development Programmes.

2.2     Junior Officer Leadership Course Two

The Junior Officer Leadership Course Two (JOLC2) is part of the Second Sea Lord’s (2SL’s) Maritime Through Career Developmentproject to provide CLM and staff training development to Officers throughout their career to 1* (OF-6, Commodore) level. JOLC2 is delivered by Powerful Squadron, part of the RNLA, and is located at BRNC Dartmouth.

JOLC2 is a recently developed 2-week progressive course, intended to build on previous training and be a prerequisite for ICSC(M). Week 1 is mainly theoretical, increasing self-awareness by the use of personality profiling tools, examining core leadership theories and introducing coaching and motivational theory. Week 2 is more practical, focusing on leadership and teamwork, and includes team-building exercises in outdoor locations.

2.3     Junior Officer Leadership Programme Three

For information on the Junior Officer Leadership Programme Three (JOLP3) please use the following link: British Army Officer Career Development Programmes.

The following: JOLP2 Record of Training will provide the reader with an idea of the work to be undertaken during the Junior OCD Programme.

2.4     Junior Officer Tactical Awareness Course

The Junior Officer Tactical Awareness Course (JOTAC) is mandatory for all British Army and Royal Marines officers and is delivered by the Land Warfare Centre, Warminster. The aim of JOTAC is to prepare Officers for the rank of Captain by raising their awareness of combined arms tactics and by developing their combat staff skills.

The purpose of JOTAC is to produce an Officer who has the requisite combat knowledge required of a sub-unit 2IC (Squadron/Company-level), a watch keeper, a liaison officer and with further training, a specialist troop commander or combat staff officer.

JOTAC consists of a 4 week course consisting of tactical exercises without troops (TEWTs) and classroom exercises assisted by computer simulation. The focus is on the sub-unit, but there is exposure to battle group and brigade levels. The training objectives include mission planning, force preparation, deployment and recovery, simulated ground manoeuvre, protection and the management of combat service support.

According to research endorsed by the Chartered Management Institute, if an employer were to pay for training to deliver equivalent employee development it would cost them in the order of £8,275 (SaBRE, 2012). This only relates to the skills that would be relevant to a civilian workplace – areas such as leadership and management skills. The cost of JOTAC training for international defence training students is estimated to be approximately £14,000 per student.

2.5     Military Knowledge Courses

The Military Knowledge (MK) range of courses is one of the results of a detailed study, the Review of Officer Career Courses (ROCC), which was commissioned to identify the education and training that officers require at various stages of their careers. Further explanation of these stages is contained in the Officer Career Development Handbook (OCDH).

MK is not like many formal military instructional manuals or other documents. It is not written in a military manner, using Defence Writing conventions and it is designed specifically for on-line study, which requires a very different style to promote effective understanding and learning and, possibly, even enjoyment!

With this in mind, the MK courses have been developed for the British Army by the Military Knowledge Office (MKO) at the Defence Academy of the United (DAUK) College of Management and Technology (CMT), in conjunction with Cranfield University.

The courses are managed by MKO for the Land Forces Training Division, the Training Requirements Authority (TRA). The Subject Matter Authority for the content of the MK courses is the Director Army Division, Joint Services Command and Staff College (JSCSC) and the Director’s staff, with nominated Army Proponents keeping the material under review in light of changes in Defence and identifying areas that need updating.

The MKO includes military authors and project managers, who are responsible for delivering updated courseware through the Cranfield University design and programming team. The MK courses are hosted on the Defence Learning Portal (the British Army’s Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)).

The JOTAC and the Captains Warfare Course (CWC) have in-tests based on lessons in their linked MK courses. Before students attend each residential course they are told what preparation is required for the respective in-test.

2.5.1  Military Knowledge 1

As directed within chapter 14 of the Officer Career Development Handbook (OCDH), the Military Knowledge 1 (MK1) course is mandated for junior Captains of the Regular Army and Royal Marines (RM). However, it is also suitable for those in the Defence and Security sectors as useful reference material for Battlegroup capability.

The aim of the course is to deliver the additional underpinning knowledge required by junior Captains of the Regular Army and RM for junior command positions, and it also provides the necessary grounding for JOTAC and MK2. MK1 focuses at the battlegroup level to deliver the military, management and technical knowledge required by junior officers. MK1 is based on approximately 45-50 hours’ web-based distance learning, consisting of six modules, with each module having a series of formative and summative assessments at the end. The modules include:

  • Module 1: The British Army.
  • Module 2: The British Approach to Operations.
  • Module 3: Battlegroup Capabilities.
  • Module 4: Battlegroup Science and Technology.
  • Module 5: Battlegroup Command and Training Tools.
  • Module 6: Battlegroup Operations.

2.5.2  Military Knowledge (Royal Marines) 1

This course is mandated for junior RM Captains in addition to them conducting MK1. However, it is also suitable for those in the Defence and Security sectors as useful reference material for formation capability.The aim of the course is to deliver the additional underpinning knowledge required by junior RM Captains of the Regular Marines for junior command positions, and it also provides the necessary grounding for JOTAC and MK2. MK(RM)1 is based on 2-4 hours web-based distance learning and consists of one module: amphibious operations, with a formative and summative assessment at the end of the module.

2.5.3  Military Knowledge 2

As directed within chapter 17 of the OCDH, the Military Knowledge 2 (MK2) course is mandated for senior Captains of the Regular Army and RM. However, it is also suitable for those in the Defence and Security sectors as useful reference material for formation capability.The aim of the course is to deliver the additional underpinning knowledge required by senior Captains of the Regular Army and RM prior to taking an SO3 (Staff Officer 3) appointment and also prepares them for the Captains Warfare Course.

MK2 focuses at the brigade level to deliver the military, management and technical knowledge required for senior Captains’ appointments prior to attendance on ICSC(L). MK2 is based on 21-25 web-based distance learning consisting of five modules, with each module having a series of formative and summative assessments at the end. The modules include:

  • Module 1: Formation Capability Part 1.
  • Module 2: Formation Capability Part 2.
  • Module 3: Formation Capability Part 3.
  • Module 4: Brigade Tactical Actions (Formation Operations).
  • Module 5: Operational Planning.
  • Module 6: Higher Management of Defence (non-assessed)

2.6     Military Analysis

Military Analysis (MA) are 1-week, classroom-based courses run at Army Education Centres (British Army, 2014a) around the world, in which students write an essay. There are three different modules of which the subjects/titles change every few years (Doomsayer, 2005) and is a requirement for promotion.

  • Module A: a study on Clausewitz
  • Module B: a study on international policy and UK doctrine
  • Module C: Title unknown

The Department of Defence and International Affairs (DIA), located in Faraday Hall at RMAS, also teaches the MA course to Captains as part of their preparation for promotion to Major (British Army, 2014b).

Students are encouraged to re-read their essays before the ICSC(L) GEOD module starts (see Section 3.2.1).

2.7     Captains Warfare Course

The Captains Warfare Course (CWC) is an 8-week residential course delivered by the Land Warfare Centre, Warminster. CWC is a pre-requisite for promotion to the rank of Major.

The MK2 distance learning package and assessment must be completed prior to attendance on CWC and all students will complete an In-Test on Day 1 of the course.  This is designed to confirm students’ levels of preparedness for the course.  Part of it includes a number of questions that will test recall of knowledge covered in the MK2 package completed prior to the course.  Additionally, students will be assessed on their ability to navigate relevant doctrine publications in order to find information.

  • No reference or access to MK2, or the information contained within the package, will be permitted during the test; this element of the assessment will be ‘closed-book’.  Students are advised to concentrate their efforts on the following modules:
    • 1.1.1 – Formation CIS
    • 1.1.2 – Area Communications Systems
    • 1.1.4 – Bowman
    • 1.2.1 – ISTAR Environment
    • 2.1.1 – DBE Capability
    • 2.2.1 – Joint Fires Environment
    • 2.3.1 – Military Engineering Support to Bde
    • 2.3.2 – Divisional or Theatre Support Units
    • 2.4.1 – GBAD Environment
    • 3.2.1 – Operational and Strategic Mobility Capability
    • 3.3.1 – CSS Capability
    • 4.1.1 – Military Activities in the Land Environment
    • 4.2.1 – The purpose of Offensive Actions
    • 4.3.1 – Purpose & Types of Defensive Actions
    • 4.4.1 – Stabilising Actions 1
    • 4.4.2 – Stabilising Actions 2
    • 4.5.1 – Enabling Actions 1
    • 4.5.2 – Enabling Actions 2
    • 4.5.3 – Enabling Actions 3
    • 5.1.1 – C2 at Formation Level
    • 5.1.2 – The Planning Process
    • 5.1.3 – Bde Staff Input to the Planning Process
    • 5.1.4 – OSW
    • The 7 Questions, as covered in MK 1 and the DLW-sponsored Combat Estimate eLearning Module.
  • Questions relating to doctrine publications will require students to provide specific page references stating where information can be found.  These questions will be selected by LWS from a question bank.  Access to relevant doctrine publications will be provided, and that element of the assessment will be ‘open-book’.
  • The pass mark for the in-test will be 60% for both parts.  Any student who fails to meet the required standard will be subject to review under the authority of Commandant LWS.  LWS reserves the right to RTU students who demonstrate inadequate preparation for the course.  Performance on the in-test will be taken as evidence for comments on students’ preparedness for the course, and a clear statement reflecting preparation for the course will be included in end of course reports.  Course reports will be sent directly to students’ Commanding Officers.  Students are strongly advised to prepare well for the In-Test.

2.7.1  Commercial Partnerships

Newman & Spurr Consultancy Ltd (commonly referred to as NSC) is a training simulation company based in Camberley, Surrey. NSC provides a range of Defence related training and the company’s computer-based training expertise is being used to hone the skills of students on the CWC (NSC, 2014a). In 2013, NSC and Atkins (a UK design, engineering and project management consultancy) were contracted by the MOD to help develop and support a range of innovative computer-based instruction methods for the British Army’s Captains’ Warfare Course (Potter, 2013).

Fulfilling a similar role to JOCASTS (Joint Operations Command and Staff Training System) but at the operational level, CONTACT is a real-time constructive simulation system that confronts commanders with the complexities of conflict (NSC, 2014b). It is currently among the teaching tools deployed on the CWC to exploit lessons learnt from previous operations and prepare personnel for future missions. Already used to support the training of command and staff officers prior to deployment, the simulation allows individuals or small groups of users to trial courses of action (COA) in a fully-customisable environment. CONTACT’s simulated exercises and assessments provide instructors with the ability to pause, rewind and fast-forward the action to deliver instant feedback or encourage syndicate discussion.

A new Smartphone app (Frost and Black, 2013) has also been developed to help Officers with the lengthy combat estimate process and underwent trials in 2013. The Seven Questions aide memoire, produced by the Directorate of Training (Army), is being used on the Captains Warfare Course and enables students to familiarise themselves with the topic before lessons and then consolidate their knowledge after. The app is also complemented by an e-learning package, available on the Army app store.

3.0     Senior Officer Development Programmes

3.1     Battlespace Techology MSc

The Battlespace Technology MSc (BTMSC) provides selected Majors, on promotion and ahead of the ICSC(L), with the technical knowledge and skills required for demanding assignments in the Technical Career Field (CF) up to and including Lieutenant Colonel.

The BTMSC course provides a broad understanding of fundamental technologies, their acquisition and support, and a deeper understanding of a particular sub-set of battlespace technologies and capability integration, to enable graduates to contribute more effectively to the delivery of defence capability.

Students initially study a broad based Introduction to Battlespace Technologies module, encompassing Lethality, Survivability, Mobility, Command and Battlespace Management and ISTAR. Students then elect to follow a technical stream in a particular area of battlespace technology, either ‘Battlespace Manoeuvre’ or ‘Information Superiority’.

Students will gain an in-depth knowledge of the relevant technology, together with a sound understanding enabling them to analyse available solutions. Students going to a modelling and simulation post will study a modelling and simulation half stream within the BM stream. This is followed by a Defence Acquisition and Project Management module, which provides the knowledge, skills and techniques critical to the delivery of capability through all stages of the Defence Acquisition cycle.

All students also undertake a module to develop an understanding of how to enhance capability through networking, including actual and potential benefits and the risks and challenges. Finally, at the end of the taught phase of the course, all students pool their knowledge in a realistic acquisition exercise exposing issues of requirements analysis, design trade-offs, capability integration and team working.

To complete the MSc, students need to plan and undertake a defence related research project in a technical subject or having a technical implication. Through this project, they will be expected to demonstrate Masters level competency in research, synthesis, analysis and critical evaluation of information associated with the acquisition or provision of defence capability.

3.1.1  Course Level

Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip): A part time, residential taught course normally over 30 weeks. Students are drawn from the ICSC(L) ‘b’ course and attend the BTMSC before starting ICSC(L) in January.  Students return to BTMSC to complete the Capability Integration module in February. On completion of this final module in April, students return to ICSC(L) from April to August.

MSc: Having successfully completed the PGDip, those students wishing to complete the MSc are expected to complete the project before the end of their two year BTC related employment posting.

3.2     Intermediate Command and Staff Course (Land)

The Intermediate Command and Staff Course (Land) (ICSC(L)) aims to prepare British Army And Royal Marines Majors, at the start of Career Stage 2, for appointments in sub-unit command (Squadron/Company-level) and on the staff to and including Lieutenant Colonel.

ICSC(L) is a residential, comprehensive and generalist mandatory career course delivered by the Army Division of the JSCSC and is delivered through a series of modules, consisting of central lectures, significant time spent in syndicate rooms (classes of 12 students) with additional time dedicated to reflection and reading. The course runs twice per year: the A Course from September to April and the B Course from January to August.

Unlike the ICSC(Maritime) and ICSC(Air) which are both 8-weeks in duration the ICSC(L) is 30-weeks in duration, the reason being that this course includes much of the tactical and technical content of the former Army Staff Course, and as noted by Jones (2102) “this is considered an anomaly and is a cause of some concern and the subject of ongoing study.”

ICSC(L) follows two terms and covers a mix of subjects ranging from:

  1. Staff and Communications Skills (Term 1);
  2. Command Leadership and Management (Term 1);
  3. Global Effects on Defence (Term 1);
  4. Management of Defence (Term 1);
  5. Equipment (Term 1);
  6. Land Warfare (Term 2);
  7. Military Assistance to Stabilisation and Development (Term 2); to
  8. Formation Level Planning (Term 2).

3.2.1  Modules

Module 01: Staff and Communications Skills

The aim of the Staff and Communications Skills (SCS) module is to introduce and apply a range of analytical, decision making and communication skills required for the (ICSC(L) and in future employment. The module runs twice a year – once as part of the ICSC(L)A course (Sept-Apr) and once as part of the ICSC(L)B course (Jan-Aug). The A course module typically runs for 5 days during the second and third weeks of September. The B course module typically runs for 5 days during the second and third weeks of January.

By the end of the course students will have gained a broader awareness of techniques and tools they can apply when conducting analysis and communication, and a greater awareness of their own learning style. To enable this, the course contains the following three elements:

  • Learning;
  • Communication Skills; and
  • Thinking Skills.

There is currently no stand-alone summative assessment for the SCS module and students should have completed the SCS section of the Military Knowledge ICSC(L) distance learning course, which is an entry requirement.

Module 02: Command, Leadership and Management

The aim of the Command, Leadership and Management (CLM) module is to develop the student’s ability to command, lead and manage soldiers and junior officers effectively in their subsequent appointments. The CLM module is delivered in three parts:

  • CLM Part 1 – leadership theory and application, ethics and the concept of culture
  • CLM Part 2 – personnel management focus within Army context.
  • CLM Part 3 – consolidation of all five elements of CLM linked to SUC and self-awareness. (Note – Sub-Unit Command issues pervade throughout the ICSC(L) course.)

The module runs twice a year – once as part of the ICSC(L)A course (Sep-Apr) and once as part of the ICSC(L)B course (Jan-Aug): The A course module typically runs for 5 days during the middle of September (Part 1), 4 days in early Dec (Part 2) and 1 day in late April/early May. The B course module typically runs for 5 days during the middle of January (Part 1), 4 days in late March/ early April (Part 2) and 1 day in late July/ early August.

There are five elements within the module as a whole, each delivered during one or more parts:  Leadership theory; Experience; Ethics; Culture; Personnel management. The three parts of the module are not examined separately. Students completing the whole of the ICSC(L) course will be examined on the Training Objective (TO2); ‘to evaluate leadership and command in the delivery of military capability’. The exam is currently a formal, individual, research and analysis based oral presentation (20 min) followed by viva (10 min).

Module 03: Global Effects on Defence

The aim of the Global Effects on Defence (GEOD0 module is to enable students to evaluate the nature of warfare, the current and emerging strategic environment, and how the military contributes to achieving the UK’s strategic goals. The module runs twice a year – once as part of the ICSC(L)A course (Sep-Apr) and once as part of the ICSC(L)B course (Jan-Aug). The A course module typically runs for just under 3 weeks from the end of Sep to the middle of October. The B course module typically runs just under 3 weeks from the end of January to the middle of February.

The GEOD module is delivered through the following four elements:

  • Element 1: Conflict and the International System, or the world in which we live, its characteristics and security mechanisms;
  • Element 2: Strategy as a Concept, including levers of power for both state and non-state actors;
  • Element 3: National Security Policies, specifically the foreign and defence policies of the UK, the role of global and regional security organisations, and the role of bilateral relationships illustrated by the US/UK and Anglo-French relationships; and
  • Element 4: Ex REGIONAL OWL. A case study looking at a specific part of the world.

The GEOD module is currently examined through completion of a 2500-word essay, completed in students’ own time, over a number of weeks. Students are also encouraged to re-read their Military Analysis essays before GEOD starts.

Module 04: Management of Defence

The aim of the Management of Defence module is to enable students to understand why and how Defence capability is generated through the application of the principles and processes associated with the higher level management of Defence and the Army. The module runs twice a year – once as part of the ICSC(L)A course (Sep-Apr) and once as part of the ICSC(L)B course (Jan-Aug). The A course module typically runs for 2.5 weeks in October. The B course module typically runs for 2.5 weeks in February.

The module is delivered through the following three elements:

  • Element 1: Higher level management of Defence.  This will cover the basic structure of the MoD; the strategic level management of Defence; the fiscal context within which Defence operates; the path from the nation’s security strategy, through Defence departmental policy, to explicit direction and structure; strategy planning and management; resourcing and equipping Defence and the Army and how the MoD approaches risk and risk management.
  • Element 2:  Defence capability.  This will cover capability development, delivery and generation and the Defence Lines of Development (DLoDs).
  • Element 3: Management of the Army.  This will explain how the Army HQ is organised, what its key functions are and the challenges and issues it is currently addressing.  It includes a one day visit to Army.

Students will benefit from familiarising themselves with the following key Defence and Army reference documents and as these form the ‘spine’ of the module:

  • The Defence Operating Model (DOM);
  • The New Operating Model – How Defence Works;
  • Defence Strategic Direction 2013 (DSD 13);
  • The Defence Reform Report (the ‘Levene Report’);
  • The Army HQ Handbook (AHH);
  • The Army Command Plan 2013/14;
  • JSP 892 – Risk Management; and
  • Additionally, two other key documents of relevance are:
    • The National Security Strategy 2010 (NSS 10); and
    • Students who are to complete the Management of Defence exam will need to ensure that they are confident with the use of the required JSP 101 templates.

This module is currently examined through completion of a written exam which takes place for the duration of half a day at the end of the module.

Module 05: Equipment

The aim of the Equipment module is to enable students to analyse how technology and equipment support Land environment operations. The module runs twice a year – once as part of the ICSC(L)A course (Sep-Apr) and once as part of the ICSC(L)B course (Jan-Aug). The A course module typically runs for 4 weeks in November. The B course module typically runs for 4 weeks in March.

Students will examine key aspects of military technology (for example, one element will consider the technologies and equipment’s that contribute to the application of lethal force, such as explosives, another element will look at technologies that enable survival such as armour etc.) and the delivery of equipment capability to meet Defence requirements.  Students will be able to understand and analyse the equipment that Defence chooses to deliver and how it manages the equipment solutions in the programme.  The key learning outcomes of the module are:

  • Understanding the technology: covering the key aspects of the main technologies that underpin our equipment and hence enable our capabilities.
  • Understanding capability: appreciating that, without the through-life integration of the Defence Lines of Development, individual technologies, equipment’s and systems cannot deliver capability.
  • Understand the concept of Trade-off: the perfect piece of equipment does not exist as the laws of physics preclude this. It is always necessary to compromise one aspect of an equipment’s (or capability’s) performance in order to maximise another aspect deemed more important. This conscious, informed act of compromise is known as a ‘trade-off’.
  • Understanding Risk: accepting a trade-off always introduces risk. The key to making a successful trade-off lies in understanding the resultant risk and, wherever possible, putting mitigating plans in place to minimise the likely impact.

The elements of the module are delivered in a logical sequence which starts with Threats and then progresses through the technological domains of: Lethality; Survivability; Mobility; Supporting Technologies and Future Technologies, introducing the relevant technology fundamentals where necessary in order to fully develop students’ understanding, before moving on to examine Business Skills, Acquisition and Capability Integration.

The Equipment module is currently examined through completion of a written exam which takes place for the duration of half a day at the end of the module.

Module 06: Land Warfare

No module details

Module 07: Military Assistance to Stabilisation & Development, Counter-insurgency and UK Operations

The aim of the Military Assistance to Stabilisation and Development (MASD), Counter-insurgency (COIN) and UK Operations (MASDUK) module is to analyse the nature of Stabilisation and Peace Support operations in the 21st Century, together with the role of the military in resilience operations in the United Kingdom (UK Operations). The module runs twice a year – once as part of the ICSC(L)A course (Sep-Apr) and once as part of the ICSC(L)B course (Jan-Aug).

The module is delivered through the following elements, in sequence:

  • Stabilisation Context and Doctrine;
  • Conduct of COIN Operations;
  • UN and Peace Support Operations;
  • Security Sector Reform;
  • Transition (end of 7 day Stabilisation package); and
  • UK Operations/ Resilience (3 days)

There is currently no stand-alone assessment for the MASDUK module. However, the 3-day UK Operations element is an accredited course which is alternative to the Emergency Planning College’s Resilience Level 2 course. The course is held at the JSCSC with the potential opportunity to participate in a follow-up exercise for two weeks in the USA.

It may also be beneficial for students, pre-course, to study the following documents:

  • JDP 3-40: Security and Stabilisation: The Military Contribution;
  • AFM Volume 1 Part 10: Countering Insurgency;
  • ADP Ops 8-4, 8-6, 8-7 and 8-14;
  • AFM Volume 1, Part 9: Tactics for Stability Ops; and
  • AFM Volume 1, Part 1, Ch 5: Formation Tactics.

Module 08: Formation Level Planning

No module details

3.2.2  Assessment

There are six formal assessments throughout the ICSC(L) course.

3.2.3  Accreditation

Currently successful completion of the courses attracts CMI and ILM accreditation on payment of the required fee. A number of academic institutions accredit the course with 120 points towards a Masters degree. Further course development should increase the range of institutions.

Successful completion of the course plus an additional essay of 4,000 words attracts 20 postgraduate level credits towards the King’s College London’s part-time postgraduate programme, War in the Modern World, which is delivered entirely online by the Department of War Studies to students anywhere in the world.

3.2.4  Prior Study

Prior to starting the ICSC(L) all students are required to complete distance learning which may take as much as 70-hours to complete and the following is indicative of the range and spread of the requirement:

  • D AD Reading List:
    • Army Doctrine Publications Operations (selected sections);
    • Staff Officers’ Handbook (selected sections);
    • Army HQ Handbook (selected sections); and
    • Selected articles from journals etc.
  • Other reference documents:
    • National Security Strategy;
    • Strategic Defence and Security Review report;
    • Joint Doctrine Note 3-11;
    • Joint Service Publication 101;
    • Military Knowledge ICSC(L);
    • Computer literacy work on the use of MS Excel, PowerPoint and Word;
    • Military Analysis module revision;
    • English diagnostics and development; and
  • Personal confirmation test.

3.3     Advanced Amphibious Warfare Course

The Advanced Amphibious Warfare Course (AAWC) comes under the auspices of the Royal Naval Division of the JSCSC. The aim of AAWC is to provide a broad understanding of the principles and roles of naval warfare in British defence policy, with particular reference to the part played by amphibious operations.

The course lasts 4-weeks for a maximum of 10 students, nominated by HQRM (both British Army and RM OF-2/3) and is mainly academic with students required to write several essays. It pursues five themes:

  • Theme 01: The history and development of amphibious operations;
  • Theme 02: The role of the RN in the context of British defence policy, maritime strategy, NATO and out-of-area operations;
  • Theme 03: Current and future developments in naval and amphibious issues and practice;
  • Theme 04: Examine current amphibious practice; and
  • Theme 05: Considering plans and maritime tactics.

Themes 1-3 provide a foundation for themes 4-5. Overall, the purpose of the course is to ensure that RM officers are fully aware of the maritime aspects of their business after a prolonged period of land warfare training.

4.0     Executive Officer Development Programmes

4.1     Advanced Command and Staff Course

For information on the Advanced Command and Staff Course (ACSC) and the Advanced Command and Staff Course (Reserves) (ACSC(R)) please use the following link: British Army Officer Career Development Programmes.

4.2     Royal College of Defence Studies Course

For information on the Royal College of Defence Studies (RCDS) Course please use the following link: British Army Officer Career Development Programmes.

4.3     Applied Technology Course for Senior Officers

For information on the Applied Technology Course for Senior Officers (ATCSO) please use the following link: British Army Officer Career Development Programmes.

4.4     Higher Command and Staff Course

For information on the Higher Command and Staff Course (HCSC) please use the following link: British Army Officer Career Development Programmes.

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