This article is organised as follows:

PART SIX: LEVEL FOUR AWARDS

6.0     Introduction

As per Army Dress Regulations (All Ranks) (February 2017) and JSP 761 (October 2016), a Mention in Despatches and Queen’s Commendations are considered level 4 awards, and their precedence is in the order shown below.

These awards fall outside the system of ‘Orders, Decorations and Medals’ but are part of the State system of honours and awards. Emblems are worn but the awards do not carry any right to post-nominal letters.

6.1     Mention in Despatches

A Mention in Despatches (MiD) is an operational gallantry award given to all ranks for an act (or acts) of bravery during active operations. This award is available posthumously. It is the oldest form of recognition of gallantry within the British armed forces. Although recipients do not receive a medal, a citation is published in the London Gazette.

There are no codified conditions of award but since September 1993 the MiD has been restricted to gallantry during active operations.

Between 1945 and 1993, a single bronze oak leaf emblem was worn on the ribbon and riband of the appropriate General Service Medal or Campaign Medal. From 03 September 1993 onwards, a silver oak leaf emblem is worn.

6.2     Queen’s Commendation for Bravery

The Queen’s Commendation for Bravery (QCB) was instituted on 26 April 1994 and is available to all ranks.

The Queen’s Commendation for Bravery (QCB) is awarded “for acts of bravery” not in the presence of the enemy (i.e. non-active operations). This award is available posthumously.

Prior to 26 April 1994, the QCB was known as the Queen’s Commendation for Brave Conduct (1952 to 1994) with a single bronze oak leaf emblem denoting the award, and prior to that the King’s Commendation for Brave Conduct (1939 to 1952), from April 1994 onwards a silver laurel emblem is worn.

6.3     Queen’s Commendation for Bravery in the Air

The Queen’s Commendation for Bravery in the Air (QCBA) was instituted on 26 April 1994 and is available to all ranks.

The QCBA is awarded “for acts of bravery” while flying not in the presence of the enemy (i.e. non-active operations). This award is available posthumously.

Prior to April 1994, the QCBA was known as the Queen’s Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air (QCVSA) with a single bronze oak leaf emblem denoting the award, from April 1994 onwards a silver eagle emblem is worn. In the 31 December 1991 Supplement of the London Gazette, there are a number of “Queen’s Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air” (QCVSA) awarded to Royal Navy, RAF, and civilian airline pilots (London Gazette, 1991, p.27).

6.4     Queen’s Commendation for Valuable Service

The Queen’s Commendation for Valuable Service (QCVS) was instituted on 26 April 1994 and is available to all ranks.

Although there are no codified conditions of award, a QCVS is awarded for meritorious service in an operational theatre (either during operations or in support of operations). This award is available posthumously.

From September 1993 onwards, a silver oak leaf spray emblem is worn.

6.5     Restrictions on Number of Emblems Worn

Since December 2014, there has been no restriction of the number of emblems awarded after 1962 that may be worn on any one medal or ribbon.

Only one emblem of each type awarded prior to 1962 may be worn on a single medal riband.

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