How Much Protein Should I Consume?

Protein is an essential macronutrient needed by the human body for growth and maintenance. Foods rich in animal protein are meat, fish, eggs, poultry, and dairy products, while plant foods high in protein are mainly legumes, nuts, and grains. With this in mind, what is the current recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for protein for an… Read More

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Protein Meals: Beans versus Meat

“A study found that protein-rich meals based on beans sated people faster than meat. They also ate 12% fewer calories at their next meal.” (REPS UK, 2017, p.7). Reference REPS UK (2017) Beasts v Beans! Fitness Matters: Official Magazine of REPS UK. Issue, Spring 2017. Leeds: Coachwise Limited.

The Endless Pendulum Swing of Fat is Good, Fat is Bad Continues

“Is a diet rich in saturated fat  a health risk or not?” (Johnson, 2016, p.18). A dog whistle question to get researchers/scientists, food commentators and self-styled experts hot under the collar. New evidence would suggest it is a health risk (Wang et al., 2016). Actually, the new evidence is a new statistical analysis of historical… Read More

Jurched vs Mongol: Carbohydrate vs Protein

“Compared to the Jurched soldiers, the Mongols were much healthier and stronger. The Mongols consumed a steady diet of meat, milk, yoghurt, and other diary products, and they fought men who lived on gruel made from various grains. The grain diet of the peasant soldiers stunted their bones, rotted their teeth, and left them weak… Read More

What’s the Real Secret to Weight Loss?

The below article, written by Sue Dunlevy – National Health Correspondent for the News Corps Australia Network, is about sugar which initiated a variety of responses (Reader Replies to, What’s the Real Secret to Weight Loss). Three things I note from the article: Moderation: noted in the reader replies; and Physical Activity: not mentioned at… Read More

Are Some Diets “Mass Murder”?

From low fat to Atkins and beyond, diets that are based on poor nutrition science are a type of global, uncontrolled experiment that may lead to bad outcomes, concludes Richard Smith (Chair, Patients Know Best writing in the British Medical Journal (BMJ)). Jean Mayer, one of the “greats” of nutrition science, said in 1965, in… Read More

Article: Cardiovascular Risk, Diabetes & Weight Loss

Cardiovascular risk can be improved in people with type 2 diabetes by reducing blood glucose concentrations and lipid profiles and by weight loss. A systematic review of dietary interventions included 20 randomised controlled trials. Glycaemic control improved more with low carbohydrate, low glycaemic index, Mediterranean, and high protein diets than with control diets; the Mediterranean… Read More