Military Recruits & Dietary Intake

Research Paper Title Dietary Intake in Relation to Military Dietary Reference Values During Army Basic Combat Training; a Multi-center, Cross-sectional Study. Background The military dietary reference intakes (MDRIs), outlined in Army Regulation 40-25, OPNAVINST 10110.1/MCO10110.49, AFI 44-141, establish standards intended to meet the nutrient requirements of Warfighters. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to… Read More

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Bacillus Cereus Isolates & Cooked Food Products Delivered by Swiss Army Catering Facilities

Research Paper Title Toxin genes and cytotoxicity levels detected in Bacillus cereus isolates collected from cooked food products delivered by Swiss Army catering facilities. Background Heated food is known to be often contaminated with B. cereus, leading to cases of diarrhoeal or emetic diseases. Battalion kitchens or army catering facilities present a food safety risk,… Read More

Discussing Captain Capon’s Cure: Food, Fitness & the British Army’s Physical Development Depots, 1936–1939

Discussion Paper Title Captain Capon’s Cure – Food, Fitness and the British Army’s Physical Development Depots, 1936–1939. Abstract In the late 1930s, the British Army faced a manpower crisis that threatened imperial defence. This predicament was made worse by the rejection on medical grounds of a worryingly high number of potential recruits. To try and reverse this… Read More

Military Catering: ORPs, Halal & Kosher Meals

Ministry of Defence (MOD) personnel in the United Kingdom (UK) and permanent bases overseas are primarily catered for through a number of facilities management contracts. British Armed Forces personnel serving on operations, exercises and Her Majesty’s ships and submarines are catered for under the Deployable Food Programme introduced on 01 October 2017. All food procured for… Read More

‘Range Stew’: One of the British Army’s Best Known Secrets!

“The Band were somewhat buoyed by the provision of ‘range stew’. Range stew is a delicacy provided primarily by Military chefs in a large thermos flask, known as a Norwegian. The contents of the stew are a closely guarded secret and it is widely believed that to give any stew a name might constrain the chef to such… Read More

Jurched vs Mongol: Carbohydrate vs Protein

“Compared to the Jurched soldiers, the Mongols were much healthier and stronger. The Mongols consumed a steady diet of meat, milk, yoghurt, and other diary products, and they fought men who lived on gruel made from various grains. The grain diet of the peasant soldiers stunted their bones, rotted their teeth, and left them weak… Read More