What is Crossing the T in Naval Warfare?

Introduction Crossing the T or capping the T is a classic naval warfare tactic used from the late 19th to the mid-20th centuries in which a line of warships crosses in front of a line of enemy ships to allow the crossing line to bring all their guns to bear while it receives fire from… Read More

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How Much Does It Cost to Fuel a Type 45 Destroyer?

What is a Type 45 Destroyer? The Royal Navy’s six Type 45 Destroyers are among the most advanced warships ever built. They are suited to a range of tasks, including Equipped with the ferocious Sea Viper missile, which can knock moving targets out of the sky from up to 70 miles away, Type 45 Destroyers… Read More

Photography of Military Vehicles/Ships on Public vs Private Land (UK)

Is It Illegal to Take Photographs of Military Vehicles, Ships, etc? Devon & Cornwall Police state: It is not illegal to take photographs or video footage in public places unless it is for criminal or terrorist purposes. They go on to state: If a person is seen taking photos outside a police station/mosque/chemical factory/facility/military base… Read More

What was the London Naval Treaty (1936)?

Introduction The Second London Naval Treaty was an international treaty signed as a result of the Second London Naval Disarmament Conference held in London, the United Kingdom. The conference started on 09 December 1935 and treaty was signed by the participating nations on 25 March 1936. Refer to Washington Naval Treaty (1922) and London Naval… Read More

What was the London Naval Treaty (1930)?

Introduction The London Naval Treaty, officially the Treaty for the Limitation and Reduction of Naval Armament, was an agreement between the United Kingdom, Japan, France, Italy, and the United States that was signed on 22 April 1930. Seeking to address issues not covered in the 1922 Washington Naval Treaty, which had created tonnage limits for… Read More

What was the Washington Naval Treaty (1922)?

Introduction The Washington Naval Treaty, also known as the Five-Power Treaty, was a treaty signed during 1922 among the major Allies of World War I, which agreed to prevent an arms race by limiting naval construction. Refer to London Naval Treaty (1930) and London Naval Treaty (1936). It was negotiated at the Washington Naval Conference,… Read More

Who was Ernst Lindemann?

Introduction Otto Ernst Lindemann (28 March 1894 to 27 May 1941) was a German Kapitän zur See (naval captain). He was the only commander of the battleship Bismarck during its eight months of service in World War II. Lindemann joined the German Imperial Navy (German: Kaiserliche Marine) in 1913, and after his basic military training,… Read More