Cruelty and Bad Faith in Military Engagements

The law of war not only disclaims all cruelty and bad faith concerning engagements concluded with the enemy during the war, but also the breaking of treaty obligations entered into by belligerents in time of peace and avowedly intended to remain in force in case of war between the contracting powers. It disclaims all extortion… Read More

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What is Military Necessity?

“Military necessity justifies a resort all the measures which are indispensable for securing this object and which are not forbidden by the modern laws and customs of war.” (US Army, 1914, p.14). What military necessity admits of (General Order 100, 1864, Article 16): Military necessity admits of all direct destruction of life or limb of… Read More

This Plague…

“My first wish is to see this plague of mankind, war, banished from the earth.” George Washington (1732 to 1799) General George Washington, also called Father of His Country, was an American general and commander in chief of the colonial armies in the American Revolution (1775-1783) and subsequently first president of the United States (1789-1797).

The Unwritten Rules of War (1914)

In addition to the written rules there exist certain other well-recognised usages and customs that have developed into, and have become recognised as, rules of warfare. These usages and customs are still in process of development. The development of the laws and usages of war is determined by three principles (US Army, 1914, p.14): First,… Read More

The Written Rules of War (1914)

The conduct of war is regulated by certain well-established and recognised rules that are usually designated as “the laws of war,” which comprise the rules, both written and unwritten, for the carrying on of war, both on land and at sea. During the past 50 years many of these rules have been reduced to writing… Read More

The lesser evil…

“War is evil, but it is often the lesser evil.” George Orwell (1903 to 1950) Eric Arthur Blair, better known as George Orwell was an English novelist, essayist, and critic famous for his novels Animal Farm (1945) and Nineteen Eighty-four (1949), the latter a profound anti-utopian novel that examines the dangers of totalitarian rule.