Is Weightlifting Better at Reducing Heart Fat than Aerobic Exercise?

A new study suggests that obese people who engage in resistance training are more likely to see reductions in a type of heart fat that has been linked to cardiovascular disease (Christensen et al., 2019). In this small study, of 50 individuals, Christensen and colleagues concluded that a certain type of heart fat known as… Read More

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The ‘Overfat’ Outbreak is Spreading!

Belly bulges are the latest threat to global health. Over 90 percent of men and half of children in the US, New Zealand, Greece and Iceland are thought to have unhealthy amounts of abdominal fat – far more than previously thought. Being“overfat” raises the risk of diabetes, stroke, heart disease and cancer. (New Scientist, 2017, p.5). Reference New Scientist (2017) Overfat Outbreak.… Read More

My Score on the Australian Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessment Tool (AUSDRISK)

AUSDRISK Sitting in the wife’s GP practice waiting for her to finish work and then take the kids to see Paw Patrol Live, I noticed a pamphlet ‘The Australian Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessment Tool’ (or AUSDRISK), and decided to ‘give it a go’. AUSDRISK was developed by the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute… Read More

Unhealthy Childhood Habits Raise Cardiovascular Risk in Adulthood

Many children risk developing coronary heart disease (CHD) in later life unless their ‘shocking’ lifestyles are improved, a charity has warned. The British Heart Foundation said that inactivity, poor diet and unhealthy eating habits were storing up cardiovascular problems for the UKs population. The charity has published a new compendium of statistics, produced in partnership… Read More

Duration of Obesity Linked with Coronary Artery Calcificatiob

With each additional year of obesity, the risk of developing subclinical heart disease increases by 2% to 4%, regardless of the absolute level of generalised or abdominal obesity. The CARDIA study recruited 3275 healthy people aged 18-30 years who were not obese. They were followed up for 25 years, with assessment of heart disease and… Read More