Displaying Leadership…

“Be an example to your men, in your duty and in private life. Never spare yourself, and let the troops see that you don’t in your endurance of fatigue and privation. Always be tactful and well-mannered and teach your subordinates to do the same. Avoid excessive sharpness or harshness of voice, which usually indicates the… Read More

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Linking Welfare, Training & Casualties

“The best form of welfare for the troops is first class training, for this saves unnecessary casualties.” Field-Marshal Erwin Rommel (the Desert Fox), World War I junior officer and World War II General, considered a brilliant military commander; adored by his troops and feared by his enemies.

Caution, Certainty & Boldness…

“Their caution was not Montgomery’s, who obviously considered that insistence on 100 per cent certainty was to be preferred to a policy of boldness, which is true in questions of strategy, although certainly not in tactics.” (Rommel, 1953, p.515).   Field-Marshal Erwin Rommel (the Desert Fox), World War I junior officer and World War II… Read More

Plans & Policy: Reality vs Wishful Thinking…

“They did not base their plans on the real possibilities of the situation, but allowed the wish to father the thought.” (Rommel, 1953, p.409). A contemporary version: “To call it a fad would be unfair; at the moment it’s a fashionable policy in search of persuasive evidence that it really works.” (Hawkes, 2013, p.25). Field-Marshal Erwin… Read More

Battles & Old Soldiers…

“…weit vom Schuss gibt alte Krieger – far from the battle makes old soldiers.” (Rommel, 1953, p.327). Field-Marshal Erwin Rommel (the Desert Fox), World War I junior officer and World War II General, considered a brilliant military commander; adored by his troops and feared by his enemies. Reference Rommel, E., Liddel Hart, B.H. (ed) &… Read More

Military Experience vs Military Theory…

“…commanders whose battles have so far all been fought in theory tend as a rule to react directly rather than indirectly to the enemy’s moves. Beginners generally lack the nerve to take decisions based on military expediency alone, without regard for what is weighing most heavily on their minds.” (Rommel, 1953, p.401). Field-Marshal Erwin Rommel (the… Read More

Exploit Tactical Successes or…

“Tactical successes must be ruthlessly exploited. A routed enemy who, on the day of his flight, can be rounded up without much effort, may reappear on the morrow restored to his full fighting power.” (Rommel, 1953, p.398). Field-Marshal Erwin Rommel (the Desert Fox), World War I junior officer and World War II General, considered a… Read More