Well Done…

“In command and leadership many qualities, attributes and techniques are required ‐‐ including drive, force, judgement, perception and others. But nothing can replace the inspiration and lift that comes from commending a job well done.” Aubrey Newman (1903 to 1994) Major General Aubrey Strode “Red” Newman (1903–1994) served in the US Army for 34 years.… Read More

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Administrative Risk…

“It is comparative easy to know what you want to do in any kind of war. Leadership consists in knowing whether you can do it ‐ the risks you have to take. In the jungle the chief risks for the higher commander, brigadier and upwards, are administrative. He must learn to be a judge of… Read More

Ethical Compromise…

“The state of ethical conduct is abysmal. Few battalion commanders can afford integrity in a zero defects environment. Telling the truth ends careers quicker than making stupid mistakes or getting caught doing something wrong. I have seen many good officers slide into ethical compromise.” Army Research Institute’s (ARI’s) command climate assessment, quoted in General Dennis… Read More

Through the Eyes…

“What troops and subordinate commanders appreciate is that a general should be constantly in personal contact with them, and should but see everything simply through the eyes of his staff.” Field Marshal A.P. Wavell (1883 to 1950) Archibald Percival Wavell, 1st Earl Wavell, in full Archibald Percival Wavell, 1st Earl Wavell (of Eritrea and of… Read More

Division of Skill…

“Man for man one division is as good as another. They vary only in the skill and leadership of their commanders.” General Bradley (1893 to 1981) Omar Nelson Bradley was a US Army officer who commanded the Twelfth Army Group, which helped ensure the Allied victory over Germany during World War II. He later served… Read More

The Head…

“The personality of the general is indispensable; he is the head, he is the all, of an army. The Gauls were not conquered by the Roman Legion, but by Caesar. It was not before the Carthagenian soldiers that Rome was made to tremble, but before Hannibal. It was not the Macedonian phalanx which penetrated into… Read More

The Final Decision…

“A Platoon Commander who joins a platoon for the first time will normally have over 150 years experience among his Warrant Officers, Sergeants, Junior NCOs and men. Use them, seek and accept advice from them but remember one thing; it is you the Platoon Commander, the leader that must make the final decision.” Master Warrant… Read More