Heroes…

“All true heroes of history will be forgotten and all villains will be remembered as heroes.” Leo Tolstoy (1828 to 1910) Leo Tolstoy, Tolstoy also spelled Tolstoi, Russian in full Lev Nikolayevich, Graf (count) Tolstoy, was a Russian author, a master of realistic fiction and one of the world’s greatest novelists. Tolstoy is best known for… Read More

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Conquer the Future & Past…

“He who controls the past commands the future. He who commands the future conquers the past.” George Orwell (1903 to 1950) Eric Arthur Blair, better known as George Orwell was an English novelist, essayist, and critic famous for his novels Animal Farm (1945) and Nineteen Eighty-four (1949), the latter a profound anti-utopian novel that examines… Read More

Ways to Preserve Your Achievements Through Memorabilia

Having the urge to store away things that remind us of a specific event, occurrence or milestone is something that is universally relatable; because there’s not a person on the planet that does not associate some object or another with an event that is close to their heart and takes them back to a well-kept… Read More

The Origins of the Market Economy: State Power, Territorial Control & Modes of War Fighting.

Title The Origins of the Market Economy: State Power, Territorial Control, and Modes of War Fighting. Outline The origin and spread of money-based commodity markets is normally attributed to a natural evolution from barter and is usually seen as a solution to problems of exchange. I [the author] want to propose that markets to a considerable degree develop historically out… Read More

Ancient Soldiers & Early Statistics

“In ancient times, the Athenian general and historian Thucydides described an attempt by soldiers to estimate the height of a wall before a siege. The calculation was made by  counting rows of bricks. Though “some [soldiers] might miss the right calculation,” he wrote, “most would hit upon it”. Making siege ladders based on the most… Read More

Battle Scars: War & Geology

In this article, in the New Scientist, Jan and Mat Zalasiewicz discuss war from the perspective of mother nature, specifically the geological legacy which we have left for future generations to ‘discover’. Verdun, The Somme, Passchendaele, Gallipoli – the battles of the first world war have become bywords for death, destruction and human misery. Historically, they are just the tip… Read More