Can Bombs Help Create Life?

“SOME bombs can help create life.” (Karath, 2017, p.16). “A series of miscalculated bombing raids aimed at an airport created more than a hundred ponds near the village of Apaj in central Hungary. The bombs fell on a type of habitat called sodic meadows, which give rise to a saline environment when covered in water. In all, 274 species, including turtles and water… Read More

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Aerial Bombing: What is the Tipping Point for the Civilian Population?

In a doctoral thesis, Ikle suggested that the proponents of airpower had overestimated the relationship between the intensity of aerial bombing and the density of a city’s surviving population. “Ikle was impressed by the amount of urban hardship and overcrowding that people could endure. But there were limits. The tipping point seemed to be reached… Read More

Aerial Bombing: A Formula for Estimating Residential Overcrowding

In a doctoral thesis, Ikle suggested that the proponents of airpower had overestimated the relationship between the intensity of aerial bombing and the density of a city’s surviving population. “Ikle devised a simple formula to predict how overcrowded the houses of a bombed-out city might become. If P1 = population of a city before destruction,… Read More

Aerial Bombing: Elasticity of Supply of Urban Housing

In a doctoral thesis, Ikle suggested that the proponents of airpower had overestimated the relationship between the intensity of aerial bombing and the density of a city’s surviving population. “…the Royal Air Force strategy of targeting residential areas and ‘de-housing’ civilians proved disappointing. The supply of urban housing was much more elastic than expected, as… Read More

Correlation: Intensity of Aerial Bombing & the Density of a City’s Surviving Population

In a doctoral thesis, Ikle suggested that the proponents of airpower had overestimated the relationship between the intensity of aerial bombing and the density of a city’s surviving population. “Before the Second World War, British planners had assumed that for every metric ton of high-explosive bombs dropped on a city, about seventy-two people would be… Read More

Bomb Destruction: Is There A Social Impact?

“In 1949, [Fred Charles] Ikle left his studies in Chicago and travelled through bombed-out Germany. The war hadn’t touched his family directly, and he wanted to know how people coped with devastation on such a massive scale. One of the cities he visited, Hamburg, had suffered roughly the same number of casualties as Nagasaki [target… Read More