It’s a No-brainer: Drinking to Thirst versus Drinking to Full

  In the seemingly never-ending academic debate on drinking to thirst or drinking to full, there is some new research suggesting our brains can gently inform us when we have had enough. “THIS isn’t hard to swallow. Our body can influence the amount of fluid we put in our body by making it easier or more difficult to… Read More

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What is the Incidence of Exertional Hyponatremia in the US Armed Forces, 2001-2016

Research Paper Title Update: Exertional hyponatremia, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2001-2016. Abstract From 2001 through 2016, there were 1,519 incident diagnoses of exertional hyponatremia among active component service members (incidence rate: 6.9 cases per 100,000 person-years [p-yrs]). The incidence rate in 2016 (6.6 cases per 100,000 p-yrs) represented a decrease of 23.3% from 2015.… Read More

Running Injuries & Illness 07

Running Illness Hyponatraemia and Fluid Replacement Individuals who attempt long distance events such as marathons will recognise the need to maintain adequate hydration. Over-hydration can, however, lead to severe illness in the form of exercise-associated hyponatraemia (EAH), which is defined as serum sodium of less than 135 mmol/l during or up to 24 hours after… Read More

Fluid Overload: Industry versus Academia

Research Paper Title Case Proven: Exercise Associated Hyponatraemia is Due to Overdrinking. So Why Did it Take 20 Years Before the Original Evidence was Accepted? Conclusions “History is replete with examples of correct ideas that were not accepted until subsequent generations confirmed their validity. Usually there is a logical reason for this delayed acceptance; often… Read More