Atrocities and Choice…

“No atrocities are committed unless human beings choose to commit them.” (The Economist, 20190, p.15). Reference The Economist. (2019) Climate of Fear: How to Think about Global Warming and War. The Economist. 25 May 2019, pp.15-16. Advertisements Advertisements

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Could Abnormal Gamma Activities be a proxy for GABA-ergic Interneuron Dysfunction and/or a Promising Neuroimaging Marker of Insidious Mild Head Injuries?

Research Paper Title Marked Increases in Resting-State MEG Gamma-Band Activity in Combat-Related Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. Background Combat-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a leading cause of sustained impairments in military service members and veterans. Recent animal studies show that GABA-ergic parvalbumin-positive interneurons are susceptible to brain injury, with damage causing abnormal increases in… Read More

What is Tactical Damage Control Resuscitation (TDCR)?

Research Paper Title Tactical Damage Control Resuscitation. Abstract Recently the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care changed the guidelines on fluid use in haemorrhagic shock. The current strategy for treating haemorrhagic shock is based on early use of components: Packed Red Blood Cells (PRBCs); Fresh Frozen Plasma (FFP); and Platelets in a 1:1:1 ratio. The… Read More

Comparing Topical Antimicrobials with Silver-nylon Dressings for Military Burn Casualties

Research Paper Title The Use of a Silver-Nylon Dressing During Evacuation of Military Burn Casualties. Background The military has used silver-nylon dressings as a topical antimicrobial on combat-related burns for the past 15 years. However, their clinical efficacy and associated risks have not been evaluated. Herein, the authors document our experience with the use of… Read More

Combatants & Infection

“In several nineteenth-century battles, about 5 percent of the combatants contracted tetanus infections; of those, about 80 percent died. Approximately 5 percent of the wounded combatants in ancient wars contracted gangrene, another infection caused by bacteria in soil. Washing of the wound could reduce the incidence, and amputation might save an infected limb, but if the… Read More

The Roman Military Medical Service

“The Roman military had a medical system that was extraordinary for the ancient world. It was based on the teachings of Greek medicine and emphasized both prevention – maintenance of conditions for good public health – and healing of battle-wounded soldiers. A nutritious diet, a carefully monitored water supply, and strict rules about sanitation helped… Read More

Deaths on the Battlefield

“As happens in many battles, the losers and winners differed not only in the proportions of men killed and wounded but also in the types of wounds suffered and, especially, in the ways they died. In ancient battles for which detailed historical documentary is available, usually fewer than 5 percent of the soldiers on the victorious… Read More