Improving Diagnostic Criteria: Surgical Outcomes & Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome (CECS)

Research Paper Title Surgical outcomes for chronic exertional compartment syndrome following improved diagnostic criteria. Background Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) presents with pain during exercise, most commonly within the anterior compartment of the lower limb. A diagnosis is classically made from a typical history and the measurement of intramuscular compartmental pressure (IMCP) testing. Improved, more… Read More

Advertisements
Advertisements

Surgical Tips for Performing Open Fasciotomies for Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome of the Leg

Research Paper Title Surgical Tips for Performing Open Fasciotomies for Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome of the Leg. Abstract Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) of the leg is a debilitating condition that has previously been characterised in athletes and military personnel. The results of surgical management in these patient populations have previously been published with inconsistencies… Read More

Post-surgical Rehabilitation following Fasciotomies for Bilateral CECS in a Special Forces Soldier: A Case Report

Research Paper Title Post-surgical Rehabilitation following Fasciotomies for Bilateral Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome in a Special Forces Soldier: A Case Report. Background The aetiology of Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome (CECS) is still unclear. The most commonly accepted theory suggests that it is a transient but debilitating process where there is an abnormally increased intracompartmental pressure… Read More

New-sub Section: CECS!

A new sub-section of the blog has been added ‘CECS: Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome’ under the main title page of ‘Injury Symptoms and Prevention’. This page looks at: What CECS is; Typical symptoms; Why it may be missed; Why missing it may matter; How CECS is diagnosed; Differential diagnosis; and Finally, how it is managed.

Running Injuries & Illness 05

Shin Pain ‘Shin splints’ describes the mid-shin discomfort experienced by runners during or after activity and represents several diagnoses, including chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS), tibial stress fracture and medial tibial periostitis (MTP), as well as vascular and nerve entrapment disorders. These conditions often co-exist and require a detailed management approach (Table 1). Table 1:… Read More