Evaluating the Use of Methylsulfonylmethane versus Placebo to Prevent Knee Pain in Military Initial Entry Trainees

Research Paper Title

A randomized controlled trial evaluating methylsulfonylmethane versus placebo to prevent knee pain in military initial entry trainees.

Background

Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is a naturally occurring sulfur containing substance that has been shown to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties. Previous studies using MSM as an oral supplement to improve pain in those patients with knee osteoarthritis have shown superiority compared to placebo. However, these studies are not translatable to active individuals performing high impact activities and have not evaluated MSM as a preventative measure.

Methods

A total of 180 subjects ranging in age from 18 to 40 years were enrolled. Subjects were randomised into 2 groups receiving either 3 grams OptiMSM methylsulfonylmethane (Bergstrom Nutrition, Vancouver, WA) or a placebo for 8 weeks. Outcomes measured were the Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and the Profile of Moods States (POMS).

Results

Three grams of MSM administered daily did not provide significant improvements in the 5 KOOS subscales or the 6 POMS subscales at 30 days or 60 days.

Conclusions

Although 3 grams of MSM daily can be used safely, there does not appear to be a significant improvement in KOOS or POMS.

Reference

Tennent, D.J., Hylden, C.M., Kocher, B.K., Aden, J.K. & Johnson, A.E. (2017) A randomized controlled trial evaluating methylsulfonylmethane versus placebo to prevent knee pain in military initial entry trainees. US Army Medical Department Journal. 2017 Oct-Dec. (3-17), pp.21-25.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply