What is the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States?

Introduction

The Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (MOLLUS), or simply the Loyal Legion is a United States patriotic order, organised 15 April 1865, by three veteran officers of the Army.

The original membership was composed of members of the Army, Navy, or Marine Corps of the United States, who had served during the American Civil War as commissioned officers in Federal service, or who had served and thereafter been commissioned, and who thereby “had aided in maintaining the honour, integrity, and supremacy of the national movement” during the Civil War.

The Loyal Legion was formed by in response to rumours from Washington of a conspiracy to destroy the Federal government by assassination of its leaders, in the immediate aftermath of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. The founding members stated their purpose as the cherishing of the memories and associations of the war waged in defence of the unity and indivisibility of the Republic; the strengthening of the ties of fraternal fellowship and sympathy formed by companionship in arms; the relief of the widows and children of dead companions of the order; and the advancement of the general welfare of the soldiers and sailors of the United States. As the original officers died off, the veterans organization became an hereditary society. The modern organisation is composed of men who are direct descendants, nephews or first cousins of these officers (hereditary members), and also other men who share the ideals of the Order (Associate members), who collectively are considered “Companions”. A female auxiliary, Dames of the Loyal Legion of the United States (DOLLUS), was formed in 1899 and accepted as an affiliate in 1915.

Origins

Following the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865, rumours spread that the act had been part of a wider conspiracy to overthrow the legally constituted government of the United States by assassinating its chief men. Many people at first gave credence to these rumours, including three of the officers assigned to the honour guard for Lincoln’s body as it was transported to Springfield, Illinois, for burial; these three men, Brevet Lieutenant Colonel Samuel Brown Wylie Mitchell, Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Ellwood Zell, and Captain Peter Dirck Keyser, are considered the founders of the Order. To demonstrate their loyalty, they decided to form a “Legion” modelled on the Revolutionary War Society of the Cincinnati. The Loyal Legion was organised largely during the same meetings that planned Lincoln’s funeral (as well as during a mass meeting of Philadelphia war veterans on 20 April), culminating in a meeting on 31 May 1865, in Independence Hall in Philadelphia, at which the name was chosen.

Originally, the Order was composed of three classes of members:

  • Officers who had fought in the Army, Navy, or Marine Corps of the United States in the suppression of the Rebellion, or enlisted men who had so served and were subsequently commissioned in the regular forces of the United States, constituted the “Original Companions of the First Class.” The eldest direct male lineal descendants of deceased Original Companions or deceased eligible officers could be admitted as “hereditary Companions of the First Class.”
  • “Companions of the Second Class” were the eldest direct male lineal descendants of living Original Companions or of living individuals who were eligible for membership in the First Class. (The use of the Rule of Primogeniture was abolished in 1905 for both the First and Second classes of membership, opening membership to all male lineal descendants, and later changes opened membership to male lineal descendants of siblings of eligible officers. As the former officers died off, and the Order became composed entirely of descendants, the Second Class of Companions was discontinued.)
  • The Third Class comprised distinguished civilians who had rendered faithful and conspicuous service to the Union during the Civil War. By the law of the Order, no new elections to this class were made after 1890.

Later History

The Loyal Legion grew rapidly in the late 19th century and had Companions in every Northern state, and also in many of the states that had once formed the Confederacy. The Commandery in Chief was established on 21 October 1885 with authority over the 14 state commanderies then in existence. Previously, the Pennsylvania Commandery functioned as the “first among equals” of the commanderies as it was both the oldest and largest.

At its height about 1900, the Order had more than 8,000 Civil War veterans as active members, including nearly all notable general and flag officers and several presidents: Ulysses S. Grant, William T. Sherman, Philip H. Sheridan, George B. McClellan, Rutherford B. Hayes, Chester A. Arthur, Benjamin Harrison, and William McKinley. The Order’s fame was great enough to inspire John Philip Sousa to compose the “Loyal Legion March” in its honour in 1890.

Today, the Order serves as a hereditary society (male descendants of eligible officers) rather than as a functioning military order (though many Companions are either military veterans or even on active military duty). Among other activities, Companions organise and participate in commemorative events, provide awards to deserving ROTC cadets, and assist with preservation efforts. Of special note is that, each year, the Loyal Legion commemorates President Lincoln’s birthday with a wreath-laying ceremony at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. In 2009, the MOLLUS helped coordinate an extended tribute with the help of the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission to celebrate the two-hundredth anniversary of Lincoln’s birthday.

There are now three basic categories of membership: Hereditary, Associate (non-hereditary), and Honorary. Just as many Original Companions of the Order were also members of the Grand Army of the Republic (the “GAR”), many current Companions of the Order are also members of the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, the legal heir to the GAR.

Organisationally, the Loyal Legion is composed of a National Commandery-in-Chief and individual state Commanderies. There are currently 20 state Commanderies.

The Loyal Legion is the third-oldest hereditary military society in the United States after the Society of the Cincinnati, instituted in 1783, and the Aztec Club of 1847.

Prominent Companions

Note that the ranks indicated are the highest the individual held in the armed forces of the United States and not necessarily the highest rank held during the Civil War.

Presidents of the United States

  • Abraham Lincoln (Captain, Illinois Militia) – Posthumously enrolled.
  • Ulysses S. Grant (General, US Army) – Veteran Companion.
  • Rutherford B. Hayes (Brevet Major General, Volunteers) – Veteran Companion and MOLLUS Commander in Chief from 1888 to 1893.
  • Chester A. Arthur (Brigadier General, New York Militia) – 3rd Class Companion.
  • Benjamin Harrison (Brevet Brigadier General, Volunteers) – Veteran Companion.
  • William McKinley (Brevet Major, 23rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry) – Veteran Companion.
  • Herbert Hoover – Honorary Companion (elected in 1964).
  • Dwight Eisenhower (General of the Army, US Army) – Honorary Companion (elected in 1953).

Note that Presidents Andrew Johnson and James Garfield were both generals in the Union Army during the Civil War, and were thus eligible to be veteran companions of MOLLUS, but did not join the Order.

Vice Presidents

  • Vice President Hannibal Hamlin, who had served under President Lincoln from 1861 to 1865, was elected as a MOLLUS Companion of the 3rd Class. While he was vice president, he served as a corporal with Company A of the Maine State Guard (aka. Maine Coast Guards) at Fort McClary in Kittery, Maine from July to September 1864.
  • Vice President Henry Wilson, who served under President Grant from 1873 until his death in 1875, was colonel of the 22nd Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry and was a MOLLUS Companion of the First Class.
  • Vice President Charles G. Dawes, who served under President Coolidge from 1925 to 1929, became a First Class Companion in succession to his father, Brevet Brigadier General Rufus Dawes. Vice President Dawes served as a brigadier general with the US Army during World War I and also received the Nobel Peace Prize.

In addition to the above, President Andrew Johnson, who was vice president prior to the death of President Lincoln and the founding of MOLLUS, was eligible to become a First Class Companion of MOLLUS but did not join the Order. President Chester A. Arthur, who was vice president prior to the death of President Garfield, was elected in 1882 as a 3rd Class Companion, while he was serving as president.

Honorary Companions

A limited number of individuals may be elected as Honorary Companions of MOLLUS. They are usually individuals who have had distinguished careers either in public service or the military.

  • President and General of the Army Dwight D. Eisenhower (elected in 1953).
  • President Herbert Hoover (elected in 1964).
  • Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz – Commander in Chief of the Pacific Fleet and Chief of Naval Operations.
  • General of the Army Omar Bradley – Chief of Staff of the United States Army and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
  • Lieutenant General Milton G. Baker.
  • Lieutenant General John L. Ballantyne III.
  • Rear Admiral Thomas V. Cooper.
  • HRH Amadeo, Prince of Savoy.
  • Mr. Ken Burns – Filmmaker.
  • Mr. Don Troiani – Artist.

Veteran Companions

United States Army

Note that the rank indicated is the highest held in the Regular Army, the Volunteers or in retirement.

  • General Ulysses S. Grant – United States Army Commanding General.
  • General William Tecumseh Sherman – United States Army Commanding General.
  • General Philip H. Sheridan – United States Army Commanding General and MOLLUS Commander in Chief, 1886-1888.
  • Lieutenant General John M. Schofield – United States Army Commanding General and MOLLUS Commander in Chief, 1899-1903.
  • Lieutenant General Nelson A. Miles – United States Army Commanding General and MOLLUS Commander in Chief, 1919-1925.
  • Lieutenant General John C. Bates – Army Chief of Staff and MOLLUS Commander in Chief, 1909-1911.
  • Lieutenant General Adna R. Chaffee – United States Army Chief of Staff.
  • Lieutenant General Henry C. Corbin – Adjutant General of the United States Army.
  • Lieutenant General Samuel B.M. Young – First United States Army Chief of Staff and MOLLUS Commander in Chief, 1915-1919.
  • Lieutenant General Arthur MacArthur – Medal of Honour recipient and MOLLUS Commander in Chief, 1912 (father of General Douglas MacArthur).
  • Brevet Lieutenant General Winfield Scott – United States Army Commanding General (1841-1861) and hero of the War of 1812.
  • Major General Thomas M. Anderson – Nephew of Brevet Major General Robert Anderson.
  • Major General Christopher C. Augur – Veteran of the Mexican War and wounded in action at the Battle of Cedar Mountain.
  • Major General Frank Baldwin – Two time Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Major General Nathaniel P. Banks – Governor of Massachusetts and Congressman.
  • Major General Zenas Bliss – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Major General Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Sr. – Cousin of Vice President and Confederate general John C. Breckinridge.
  • Major General John R. Brooke – MOLLUS Commander in Chief, 1905-1907.
  • Major General Ambrose Burnside – GAR Commander-in-Chief, 1871-1873; Governor of Rhode Island and United States Senator.
  • Major General Daniel Butterfield – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Major General George Cadwalader – First MOLLUS Commander and Chief, 1865–79.
  • Major General Silas Casey – Career Army Officer.
  • Major General John Clem – Youngest Union soldier in the Civil War.
  • Major General George Armstrong Custer – Legendary Cavalryman and cultural icon.
  • Major General Napoleon J.T. Dana.
  • Major General Grenville M. Dodge – MOLLUS Commander in Chief, 1907-1909.
  • Major General William H. Emory.
  • Major General Francis Fessenden – Lost a leg while commanding a brigade in the Red River Campaign. Mayor of Portland, Maine.
  • Major General James W. Forsyth – Commander of the 7th Cavalry Regiment at the Wounded Knee Massacre.
  • Major General William B. Franklin.
  • Major General John Gibbon – MOLLUS Commander in Chief, 1895-1896.
  • Major General George L. Gillespie – Medal of Honour recipient, Chief Engineer and Assistant Chief of Staff of the United States Army.
  • Major General Gordon Granger – Author of the Juneteenth proclamation.
  • Major General Adolphus Greely – Arctic explorer and Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Major General George S. Greene – Hero of Culp’s Hill in the Battle of Gettysburg.
  • Major General Schuyler Hamilton – Grandson of Alexander Hamilton.
  • Major General Winfield Scott Hancock – MOLLUS Commander in Chief, 1879-1886.
  • Major General Guy V. Henry – Recipient of the Medal of Honour.
  • Major General Oliver Otis Howard – Founder and namesake of Howard University.
  • Major General Henry Jackson Hunt – Commanded Union artillery during Picket’s Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg.
  • Major General Erasmus D. Keyes.
  • Major General J. Warren Keifer – US Representative and veteran of the Spanish-American War.
  • Major General William August Kobbé.
  • Major General Henry W. Lawton – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Major General John A. Logan – GAR Commander-in-Chief, 1868-1871; founder of Decoration Day; United States Senator and vice presidential candidate.
  • Major General George B. McClellan – United States Army Commanding General.
  • Major General Henry C. Merriam – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Major General Wesley Merritt – Superintendent of West Point.
  • Major General Robert Patterson – Veteran of the War of 1812, Mexican War and Civil War.
  • Major General John Pope
  • Major General John C. Robinson – Commander-in-Chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, 1877-1879; Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1873–74; and Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Major General William S. Rosecrans.
  • Major General Thomas H. Ruger.
  • Major General Theodore Runyon – Mayor of Newark, New Jersey and Ambassador to Germany.
  • Major General William R. Shafter – Commander of V Corps in Cuba during the Spanish-American War.
  • Major General Thomas W. Sherman.
  • Major General Henry W. Slocum.
  • Major General David S. Stanley – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Major General George Stoneman – Governor of California.
  • Major General Samuel S. Sumner.
  • Major General Alfred Terry.
  • Major General George H. Thomas – Hero of the Battles of Chickamauga, Chattanooga and Nashville.
  • Major General Frank Wheaton.
  • Major General Loyd Wheaton – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Major General James Harrison Wilson – Veteran of the Civil War, Spanish-American War and the Boxer Rebellion.
  • Major General Thomas J. Wood.
  • Brevet Major General Adelbert Ames – Governor of and Senator from Mississippi.
  • Brevet Major General Russell A. Alger – GAR Commander-in-Chief, 1889-1890; Secretary of War during the Spanish-American War.
  • Brevet Major General Nicholas Longworth Anderson – Nephew of Brevet Major General Robert Anderson and father of Ambassador Larz Anderson.
  • Brevet Major General Robert Anderson – Hero of Fort Sumter.
  • Brevet Major General Christopher Columbus Andrews – Diplomat and forester.
  • Brevet Major General Absalom Baird – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Brevet Major General John G. Barnard – Distinguished military engineer.
  • Brevet Major General George L. Beal – Treasurer of Maine.
  • Brevet Major General John Milton Brannan – Career Army officer. Served in Mexican and Civil Wars.
  • Brevet Major General James Henry Carleton.
  • Brevet Major General Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain – Hero of Little Round Top in the Battle of Gettysburg and Governor of Maine.
  • Brevet Major General Augustus Louis Chetlain – Organised first Black Regiment in the Western Theatre.
  • Brevet Major General Philip St. George Cooke – Author of cavalry tactics.
  • Brevet Major General Charles Devens – Commander-in-Chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, 1873-1875.
  • Brevet Major General James Deering Fessenden.
  • Brevet Major General James Barnet Fry.
  • Brevet Major General George W. Getty.
  • Brevet Major General David McM. Gregg – Cavalry commander.
  • Brevet Major General Cyrus Hamlin – Son of Vice President Hannibal Hamlin.
  • Brevet Major General John F. Hartranft – GAR Commander-in-Chief, 1875-1877; Governor of Pennsylvania and Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Brevet Major General Albion P. Howe – Veteran of both the Mexican War and the Civil War.
  • Brevet Major General George H. Nye – Commander of the 29th Maine Regiment.
  • Brevet Major General Richard W. Johnson.
  • Brevet Major General Hugh Judson Kilpatrick – one of the youngest generals in the Civil War.
  • Brevet Major General Theodore S. Peck – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Brevet Major General Galusha Pennypacker – Youngest general during the Civil War.
  • Brevet Major General George H. Sharpe – Secret service agent.
  • Brevet Major General William Wells – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Brevet Major General Orlando B. Willcox – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Brigadier General George Lippitt Andrews.
  • Brigadier General John B. Babcock – Career officer and Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Brigadier General Richard Napoleon Batchelder – Quartermaster General and Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Brigadier General Joshua Hall Bates – Ohio state senator.
  • Brigadier General William E. Birkhimer – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Brigadier General Louis H. Carpenter – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Brigadier General Thomas Lincoln Casey – Engineer who completed the Washington Monument.
  • Brigadier General Powell Clayton – Governor of Arkansas, US Senator and Ambassador to Mexico.
  • Brigadier General Charles A. Coolidge.
  • Brigadier General Thomas L. Crittenden.
  • Brigadier General Eugene D. Dimmick – Career officer.
  • Brigadier General Edgar S. Dudley.
  • Brigadier General Richard C. Drum – US Army adjutant general.
  • Brigadier General Charles P. Eagan – US Army Commissary General court-martialed during the “embalmed beef” scandal during the Spanish-American War. Expelled from MOLLUS after making disparaging remarks about General Nelson Miles before a Congressional committee investigating the scandal.
  • Brigadier General Lucius Fairchild – MOLLUS Commander in Chief, 18931-895; GAR Commander-in-Chief, 1886–87; Governor of Wisconsin and Minister to Spain.
  • Brigadier General Samuel W. Fountain – MOLLUS Commander in Chief, 1930.
  • Brigadier General Edward S. Godfrey – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Brigadier General Edward H. Hobson.
  • Brigadier General Lucius F. Hubbard – Governor of Minnesota. Veteran of both the Civil War and the Spanish-American War.
  • Brigadier General Eli L. Huggins – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Brigadier General Bernard J. D. Irwin – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Brigadier General Alexander Cummings McWhorter Pennington Jr. – Career Army officer.
  • Brigadier General Richard Henry Pratt – Founder of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School.
  • Brigadier General Americus V. Rice – United States Representative.
  • Brigadier General Edmund Rice – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Brigadier General George B. Rodney.
  • Brigadier General William H. Seward Jr. – Son of Secretary of State William Seward.
  • Brigadier General Rufus Saxton – Third Medal of Honoir recipient.
  • Brigadier General Jacob H. Smith.
  • Brigadier General Julius Stahel – Hungarian-American Medal of Honoir recipient and diplomat.
  • Brigadier General Edwin Vose Sumner, Jr.
  • Brigadier General David G. Swaim – Judge Advocate General of the US Army.
  • Brigadier General George Miller Sternberg – US Army Surgeon General.
  • Brigadier General Egbert L. Viele – United States Representative.
  • Brigadier General Daniel D. Wheeler – Medal of Honoir recipient.
  • Brigadier General Samuel Whitside – Major of the 7th Cavalry Regiment at the Wounded Knee Massacre.
  • Brigadier General John Moulder Wilson – Chief Engineer of the Army and Medal of Honoir recipient.
  • Brigadier General Carle A. Woodruff – Medal of Honoir recipient.
  • Brigadier General Horatio Gouverneur Wright – Chief Engineer of the United States Army.
  • Brigadier General M.A.W. Shockley – medical corps career officer.
  • Brevet Brigadier General Charles Francis Adams Jr. – Railroad commissioner.
  • Brevet Brigadier General John Jacob Astor III – Philanthropist and socialite.
  • Brevet Brigadier General John C. Black – Medal of Honour recipient and Commander in Chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, 1903-1904.
  • Brevet Brigadier General Charles Brayton – Rhode Island postmaster and political boss.
  • Brevet Brigadier General Cecil Clay – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Brevet Brigadier General Henry B. Clitz – Veteran of Mexican War.
  • Brevet Brigadier General Amasa Cobb – United States Representative.
  • Brevet Brigadier General Rufus Dawes – Great-grandson of patriot William Dawes.
  • Brevet Brigadier General Samuel Fallows – Reformed Episcopal bishop.
  • Brevet Brigadier General John P. S. Gobin – GAR Commander-in-Chief, 1897-1898; and lieutenant governor of Pennsylvania.
  • Brevet Brigadier General Nathan Goff, Jr.
  • Brevet Brigadier General Edwin S. Greeley – President General of the Sons of the American Revolution.
  • Brevet Brigadier General Charles Hamlin – Son of Vice President Hannibal Hamlin.
  • Brevet Brigadier General Albert G. Lawrence – Ambassador to Costa Rica.
  • Brevet Brigadier General John Willock Noble – Secretary of the Interior.
  • Brevet Brigadier General Ario Pardee, Jr. – Defended Culp’s Hill at the Battle of Gettysburg.
  • Brevet Brigadier General Ely S. Parker – Seneca Native American aide to General Grant.
  • Brevet Brigadier General Horace Porter – Medal of Honour recipient and United States Ambassador to France.
  • Brevet Brigadier General Samuel Miller Quincy – Mayor of New Orleans.
  • Brevet Brigadier General Isaac R. Sherwood – US Representative
  • Brevet Brigadier General Augustus B. R. Sprague – Mayor of Worcester, Massachusetts.
  • Brevet Brigadier General Hazard Stevens – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Brevet Brigadier General William S. Tilton.
  • Brevet Brigadier General Francis A. Walker – President of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  • Brevet Brigadier General Stephen Minot Weld Jr. – Businessman and horticulturalist.
  • Brevet Brigadier General Joseph N. G. Whistler – Cousin of the artist James Abbott McNeill Whistler.
  • Brevet Brigadier General Edward W. Whitaker – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Colonel Charles Anderson – 93rd Ohio Infantry, 27th Governor of Ohio, wounded at Stones River.
  • Colonel James S. Casey – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Colonel George Earl Church – Civil engineer, geographer, and explorer.
  • Colonel John W. Foster – Ambassador and Secretary of State.
  • Colonel James Jackson – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Colonel William P. Kellogg – United States Senator and Governor of Louisiana.
  • Colonel John Mason Loomis.
  • Colonel Douglas Putnam – Fought at the battles of Shiloh and Missionary Ridge.
  • Colonel Matthew Quay – United States Senator and Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Colonel Henry R. Tilton – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Colonel John Tweedale – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Colonel Wheelock G. Veazey – GAR Commander-in-Chief, 1890-1891; and Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Colonel John Wainwright – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Colonel William C. Webb – Political figure.
  • Colonel Henry Wilson – Vice President of the United States.
  • Brevet Colonel Eugene B. Beaumont – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Brevet Colonel Stephen P. Corliss – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Brevet Colonel Benjamin W. Crowninshield – Aide de camp to General Philip Sheridan.
  • Brevet Colonel Johnston de Peyster – Raised first Union flag over Richmond in 1865.
  • Brevet Colonel Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. – Supreme Court associate justice.
  • Brevet Colonel Horatio Collins King – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Brevet Colonel Augustus Pearl Martin – Mayor of Boston.
  • Brevet Colonel Walter S. Payne – Commander-in-chief of the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, 1885-1887.
  • Brevet Colonel Elisha Hunt Rhodes – Diarist and author and also served as Senior Vice Commander-in-Chief of the GAR.
  • Brevet Colonel Washington A. Roebling – Engineer of the Brooklyn Bridge.
  • Lieutenant Colonel William Henry Harrison Benyaurd – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Lieutenant Colonel James M. Burns – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Frederick Fuger – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Asa Bird Gardiner – Lawyer, author, and controversial political figure.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Eli Lilly – Pharmaceutical chemist, industrialist, and entrepreneur.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Theodore Lyman – Congressman from Massachusetts.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Levi Parker Wright – First Commander of Fort Whipple which became Fort Myer
  • Lieutenant Colonel T. Elwood Zell – Founder of MOLLUS.
  • Brevet Lieutenant Colonel Henry A. du Pont – Medal of Honour recipient, industrialist and United States Senator.
  • Brevet Lieutenant Colonel Robert Hale Ives Goddard – Businessman and reformist politician.
  • Brevet Lieutenant Colonel Samuel Brown Wylie Mitchell – Founder of MOLLUS.
  • Major Charles DeRudio – Adventurer.
  • Major John Mead Gould – Author, diarist, and banker.
  • Major Moses Harris – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Major Miles Moylan – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Major Charles M. Rockefeller – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Major Joseph A. Sladen – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Major William Warner – GAR Commander-in-Chief, 1888-1889.
  • Major Edmund Zalinski – Inventor of the pneumatic dynamite gun.
  • Surgeon John Maynard Woodworth – First Surgeon General of the United States.
  • Brevet Major Charles E. Belknap – US Representative.
  • Brevet Major Augustus P. Davis – Founder of the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War.
  • Brevet Major Ira H. Evans – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Brevet Major Rufus King Jr. – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Brevet Major George H. Maynard – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Brevet Major John Patterson Rea – GAR Commander-in-Chief, 18870-1888.
  • Brevet Major John Wallace Scott – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Brevet Major Adelbert B. Twitchell – Educator.
  • Captain John G.B. Adams – Medal of Honour recipient and GAR commander in chief, 1893-1894.
  • Captain Robert Burns Beath – GAR Commander-in-Chief, 1883-1884.
  • Captain George W. Brush – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • Captain Edward Lyon Buchwalter – Business executive.
  • Captain Samuel Swinfin Burdett – GAR Commander-in-Chief, 1885-1886.
  • Captain Robert G. Carter – Medal of Honor recipient.
  • Captain Theodore R. Davis – Illustrator.
  • Captain William W. Douglas – Chief Justice of the Rhode Island Supreme Court.
  • Captain and Governor Elisha Dyer – Governor of Rhode Island.
  • Captain Peter Dirck Keyser – Founder of MOLLUS.
  • Captain Oscar Lapham – US Representative from Rhode Island.
  • Captain Robert Todd Lincoln – Son of President Abraham Lincoln.
  • Captain George Sargent Merrill – GAR Commander-in-Chief, 1881-1882.
  • Captain Elias Riggs Monfort – GAR Commander-in-Chief, 1915-1916.
  • Captain Walter S. Payne – Commander-in-Chief of the Sons of Veterans, 1885-1887.
  • Captain Prince Philippe, Count of Paris (aka Philippe d’Orleans) – Claimant to the French throne.
  • Captain Charlemagne Tower – lawyer and businessman.
  • Brevet Captain Joseph B. Foraker – Governor of Ohio and United States Senator.
  • 1st Lieutenant Francis E. Brownell – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • 1st Lieutenant John Galloway – Medal of Honour recipient.
  • 1st Lieutenant Charles P. Goodyear Jr. – Son of vulcanised rubber inventor Charles Goodyear.
  • 1st Lieutenant Charles A. Longfellow – Son of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.
  • 1st Lieutenant John L. Mitchell – United States Senator and father of aviation prophet Billy Mitchell.
  • 1st Lieutenant John Palmer – GAR Commander-in-Chief, 1891-1892; and New York Secretary of State.
  • 1st Lieutenant Amos Madden Thayer – Federal judge.
  • 1st Lieutenant William G. Thompson – Mayor of Detroit, Michigan.
  • 2nd Lieutenant Marcus A. Hanna – United States Senator and political boss.
  • 2nd Lieutenant Abraham G. Mills – President of the National League.
  • Chaplain Charles Comfort Tiffany – Episcopal clergyman.
  • Chaplain Henry Clay Trumbull – Leader in the Sunday School Movement.

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