British Army Pay Rise Finally Arrives

Hard working soldiers will soon have extra cash in their wallets after the government announced an inflation-busting salary boost for all troops up to the rank of brigadier.

The Minsitry of Defence (MOD) confirmed that personnel would receive a 2% pay increase – which will be backdated to 01 April and in wage packets at the end of September.

It means an Infantry Lance Corporal with four years of service will be £537
better off per year.

Although the X-factor will remain the same, compensatory allowances are
also being bolstered by 2%. And new longer separation payments – specifically for those at high readiness – are being considered.

While costs in all three bands of family and single living accommodation are rising, the increase is below 1%.

Scoff prices are also remaining unchanged for the time being – £5.45 covers the daily food charge although this will be reviewed in September.

Maj Ian Thomas (AGC (RMP)), from the Army remuneration policy team,
confirmed that the package – which follows recommendations by the Armed Forces pay review body – had originally been due in April this year but was delayed. He added: “The increase is good news – a pay rise above inflation. At a time when there has been quite a strain on public finances, this reflects the work and responsibilities of our troops over the last 12 months.”

Maj Thomas pointed out that Reservist pay would increase proportionally – they would also see a 2% hike in training bounties.

And recruitment and retention payments – with the exception of diving and parachute instructors – will go up in line with the basic pay rise. Both exemptions are to be fully reexamined over the next 12 months.

Meanwhile, extra cash has been put aside for specialists. Military GPs and dentists will see their trainer pay uplifted by 2 1/2%. The package will also boost the salary spines of nursing, veterinary and Military Provost Guard Service staff by 2%.

Reference

Soldier. (2020) Overdue Pay Rise Arrives. Soldier: Magazine of the British Army. August 2020, pp.11.

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