Do Concussed Service Members Underestimate the Influence of Rest during Acute Recovery?

Research Paper Title

Beliefs About the Influence of Rest During Concussion Recovery May Predict Activity and Symptom Progression Within an Active Duty Military Population.

Background

To evaluate relationships between beliefs about the impact of rest and the level of activities and symptoms over time among active duty Service members sustaining concussion, and whether these relationships vary by provision of concussion education.

Longitudinal study using multilevel modeling to assess the relationship between beliefs about rest within 72 hours of concussion and change in activity and symptom level over time, as well as interaction by concussion education at the initial clinic visit.

Methods

The study was set in three military treatment facilities. Study participants included active duty Service members diagnosed with a concussion (N=111; median age, 24 y). Individuals with previous history of concussion within 12 months of study enrolment were excluded.

Activity questionnaire and the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory assessed within 72 hours of concussion; at 1 week; and at 1, 3, and 6 month(s) postinjury.

Results

Receipt of concussion education from providers was significantly associated with greater belief that rest influences concussion recovery.

Greater belief that rest influences symptom recovery at the acute stage of concussion was associated with a greater increase in activities over time, but only among those who received education from their provider.

Additionally, greater belief about the influence of rest was related to a more rapid decrease in symptoms over time.

Conclusions

Concussed Service members who underestimate the influence of rest during acute recovery may be at risk for poorer recovery.

Treatment of Service members with postconcussive symptoms should consider patient knowledge and/or beliefs about rest and recovery, which may influence prognosis.

The results support the provider’s use of concussion education to correct potential misconceptions that may negatively impact symptom recovery.

Reference

Remigio-Baker, R.A., Gregory, E., Cole, W.R., Bailie, J.M., McCulloch, K.L., Cecchini, A., Stuessi, K., Andrews, T.R., Mullins, L. & Ettenhofer, M.L. (2020) Beliefs About the Influence of Rest During Concussion Recovery May Predict Activity and Symptom Progression Within an Active Duty Military Population.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.